[Learn Android Studio 汉化教程] 目录及序言



英文版PDF下载:http://ask.android-studio.org/?/question/787

Contents at a Glance
About the Authors ..................................................................................................xvii
About the Technical Reviewer ................................................................................xix
Acknowledgments ..................................................................................................xxi
Introduction ..........................................................................................................xxiii
■■Chapter 1: Introducing Android Studio .................................................................. 1
■■Chapter 2: Navigating Android Studio ................................................................ 27
■■Chapter 3: Programming in Android Studio ........................................................ 45
■■Chapter 4: Refactoring Code ................................................................................ 69
■■Chapter 5: Reminders Lab: Part 1 ........................................................................ 89
■■Chapter 6: Reminders Lab: Part 2 ...................................................................... 121
■■Chapter 7: Introducing Git ................................................................................. 145
■■Chapter 8: Designing Layouts ............................................................................ 189
■■Chapter 9: Currencies Lab: Part 1 ...................................................................... 241
■■Chapter 10: Currencies Lab: Part 2 .................................................................... 267
■■Chapter 11: Testing and Analyzing .................................................................... 297
■■Chapter 12: Debugging ...................................................................................... 313
■■Chapter 13: Gradle ............................................................................................. 339
■■Chapter 14: More SDK Tools .............................................................................. 371
■■Chapter 15: Android Wear Lab ........................................................................... 407
■■Chapter 16: Customizing Android Studio .......................................................... 431
Index ..................................................................................................................... 445

Contents
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About the Authors


Adam Gerber was among the first early beta adopters of Android Studio, which he uses to develop Android applications professionally and to instruct his students at the University of Chicago where he teaches Android Application Development and Technology Entrepreneurship among other courses. Adam also holds workshops and consults on mobile technology and entrepreneurship. Adam is a member of the Chicago Innovation Exchange and cofounder of PhoneTender (phonetender.com), which is revolutionizing the retail industry by automating the retail shopping experience. Adam holds a Bachelors degree in Industrial Design from the University of Illinois and a PhD with honors in Management Science from the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers in Paris. Adam’s email is gerber[-at-]uchicago.edu.


Clifton Craig has been working as a software engineer for over 16 years. His experience covers J2ME/BlackBerry, Android, and iOS, as well as back-end JEE-based systems.He has worked on several high-profile projects, including the MapQuest Gas Prices web portal, MapQuest for Mobile on
J2ME and Android, MapQuest 4 Mobile iOS, and Skype for iOS and Android. He maintains a tech blog (cliftoncraig.com), where he covers a variety of software topics, from Android and Linux to iOS and OSX. He has military experience and is an avid bicyclist, a devout Christian, and a father of two talented little girls.

About the Technical
Reviewer
Jim Graham received a bachelor of science in electronics with a specialty in
telecommunications from Texas A&M University in 1989. He was published in the
International Communications Association’s 1988 issue of ICA Communique (“Fast Packet
Switching: An Overview of Theory and Performance”). He has worked as an associate
network engineer in the Network Design Group at Amoco Corporation in Chicago, Illinois;
as a senior network engineer at Tybrin Corporation in Fort Walton Beach, Florida; and as an
intelligence systems analyst at both 16th Special Operations Wing Intelligence and HQ US
Air Force Special Operations Command Intelligence at Hurlburt Field, Florida. He received a
formal letter of commendation from the 16th Special Operations Wing Intelligence in 2001.

Acknowledgments
Covering a topic as vast as Android and a tool as powerful as Android Studio requires the
involvement, effort, and coordination of several individuals. We would like to acknowledge
and thank our editors and technical reviewers, Corbin Collins, Mark Powers, and Jim
Graham. In addition, we would like to acknowledge others who have made an impact either
directly or indirectly.
Throughout most of the writing process, Android Studio was in beta and thus a moving
target. Our labs and code examples had to be redone so often that I’ve lost track of the
number of iterations. Many thanks to my co-author, Clifton Craig, who dealt with all of this
uncertainty in stride. I would also like to thank my family and friends, particularly Mia Park,
for supporting me throughout the process which has been both challenging and rewarding.
I’d like to thank my business partner, Matthew Curtis, for tolerating my absence and for his
contagious optimism and diligence with our company PhoneTender. I’d also like to thank
Marilyn Meyers for always believing in me. Much thanks to the excellent and professional
team at Apress whose editorial support was critical.
—Adam Gerber

I thank Onur Cinar for introducing me to the kind people at Apress. I thank my co-author,
Adam Gerber, for always maintaining a positive attitude throughout and being an excellent
motivator. Thanks also goes to some of my closest friends, Juan Carlos Jimenez, Steve
O’Sullivan, Nizam Gok, and Yanxia Zhang for their constant support and encouragement
when things looked very uncertain. Managing a full-time career in the top tech companies
requires a constant balance between your work life and home life. Fitting a technical
book in between can be a Herculean task. During the process, many things have to be
sacrificed or neglected. I would like to extend a thank you to my managers, Will Camp
and Aravind Vijayakirthi, for tolerating my stumbles and coaching me throughout. Finally,
I acknowledge and thank my wife, Altaress, who was always there for me and our kids when
my head was plunged neck deep into my laptop.
—Clifton Craig

Introduction
Around 530 million years ago, during an age geologists call the Cambrian explosion, a
wide variety of species including all the phyla that exist today burst into existence within as
little as 10 million years—a mere flash in geological time. Scientists continue to marvel at
this phenomenon, and Darwin himself suggested that the Cambrian explosion happened
so swiftly that it might well cast doubt on his theory of natural selection. Today we are
experiencing the technological equivalent of the Cambrian explosion. The U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics predicts that a person graduating high school today will have 11 jobs in her lifetime,
and much of this career transience can be attributed to the pace of technological change.i
Technology begets more technology, and new technologies proliferate with ever-increasing
speed. Some of these new technologies will survive beyond a few years, but most will
not. There is little worse than investing time and energy in acquiring a new skill that is
obsolete on arrival or whose utility is short-lived. We wrote this book because we believe
that the tools and technologies covered herein will endure and that they are well worth your
investment.

Small Is Beautiful
Moore’s Law, which states that processing power doubles approximately every 18 months,
is relentless. Over the past few years, laptop computers have achieved performance
parity with their larger desktop cousins. Laptops and notepad computers accounted for
81 percent of PC sales in 2014ii, and sales are projected to increase at the expense of
desktop sales, which are conversely projected to decline. The brilliance of this trend is that
no individual or group has the power to arrest or reverse it—such is the power of economic
forces, which are the result of aggregate individual choices. Laptops will be the tool of
choice for knowledge workers for roughly the next ten years. However, a silent revolution is
currently afoot that will soon topple the almighty laptop. Around 2025, or possibly sooner,
our smartphones will achieve performance parity with our laptops—which is to say that
the larger form-factor will no longer afford any performance advantages over the smaller.
Ultimately, our mobile computer (MC) will be used for the vast majority of computing
applications, even those applications that you and I can only imagine doing on our laptops
today. This revolution is just as predictable and just as certain as the one that overthrew the
desktop. In the meantime, you can expect your MC (in other words, your smartphone or
tablet) to start functioning in ways that resemble your laptop, including the ability to dock to
peripherals such as keyboards, monitors, and mice.
The personal computer (PC) age is coming to a close, but the MC age will actually be far
more personal. Soon a whole host of new wearable devices such as watches, glasses, and
shoes will be available. We envision a day in the not-too-distant future in which we will wear
our computers on our bodies and dock to monitors, keyboards, and mice wherever those
peripherals are available. This will truly be an age of personal computing, though we are not
likely to call it that.

Android Advantages
If you aspire to become an Android developer, you’ve made an excellent choice. Billions of
people in the developing world will be coming online in the next decade. For most of these
people, their first computers will be smartphones, and most of these smartphones will be
powered by Androidiii. There’s good reason for our optimism and already a lot of historical
data from which we can extrapolate. Gartner Group projects that 1.25billion Android devices
will be sold in 2015iv. At the time of this writing, Android accounts for over three-quarters
of the Chinese market alonev, and Chinese consumers are prepared to make staggeringly
large investments in mobile devices, some spending as much as 70 percent of their monthly
salary on a new mobile device because connectivity is a prerequisite for participation in the
global economy.vi China is the largest market in sheer volume, but we can observe similar
trends across the developing world. Furthermore, because the Android OS is open source
and free, it is almost always the first choice among manufacturers of TV consoles, gaming
systems, augmented reality systems, and other electronic devices, of which there are many.
Android will continue to consolidate its dominant global market position for several
reasons. Android’s modular architecture allows for a wide variety of configurations and
customizations. All the core applications that ship standard with Android devices are
interchangeable with any number of third-party applications, and that includes applications
like the phone dialer, the e-mail client, the browser, and even the OS navigator. Android
devices are available in an amazing variety of shapes and functions. There are Android
augmented reality glasses, Android game consoles (of which Ouya is the most notable),
Android watches, Android tablets of every conceivable size, and, of course, Android
smartphones.

Android’s core technologies compare favorably to those of its principal competitors.
Android’s inclusive and open source charter has attracted a large and impressive collection
of allies, including Samsung, which is among the most innovative companies in the world.
A freevii and customizable operating system means that Android device manufacturers
can focus on bringing products to market with unrivaled value, and the highly competitive
Android device market continues to produce inexpensive, high-quality, and architecturally
open devices.

Android Studio Is Revolutionary
As a knowledge worker, your choice of tools can mean the difference between struggling
and thriving. We’re always searching for tools that increase productivity and automate work.
Certain tools have benefits that are so apparent that one adopts them immediately. Android
Studio is one such tool.

We were introduced to Android Studio just a few days after its prerelease at Google I/O
in 2013. Prior to that time, we had both been using Android Developer Tools (ADT) both
professionally and in the classroom. ADT is an Android development environment built upon
the opensource integrated development environment (IDE) called Eclipse. While Android
Studio was still in early prerelease, we both began to use Android Studio professionally.
Android Studio is a collaboration between JetBrains and Google. Android Studio is built atop
JetBrain’s IntelliJ, and so its functionality is a superset of IntelliJ. Most anything you can do
with IntelliJ, you can also do in Android Studio. Android Studio is revolutionary because it
streamlines the Android development process and makes Android development far more
accessible than it has previously beenviii. Android Studio is now the official IDE for Android.

The Android Tools Ecosystem
Android is a technology platform with its own ecosystem of tools to support it. After Android
Studio, the next most important tool in the Android ecosystem is Git. Git is a distributed
source-control tool that is quickly becoming the standard not only for mobile development,
but for software engineering in general. We have never worked on a mobile development
project that does not use Git for version control. Git could very well be the subject of another
book, but fortunately you needn’t understand all of Git’s functionality to be proficient at using
it. Android Studio has an excellent, full-featured, and integrated Git tool with an impressive
GUI interface. In this book, we cover the features you need to know to be an effective
Git user and then point you to resources for additional study if you wish to deepen your
knowledge of this indispensible tool.

Another important tool in the Android ecosystem is Gradle. Gradle is a build tool similar to
Ant and Maven that allows you to manage libraries and library projects, run instrumentation
tests, and create conditional builds. Android Studio does a good job of managing libraries
all on its own, but Gradle makes this task easy and portable. As with Git, Gradle is fully
integrated into Android Studio, which ships with an impressive array of views that allow the
user to inspect Gradle files graphically and examine the output of a Gradle build process.

Android and Java
If you attempt to develop Android apps in Android Studio without first having a good
understanding of Java, you will be frustrated. Java is an extremely useful and popular
programming language for many reasons. Perhaps the most important reason for Java’s
popularity is that Java is memory managed. Memory managed means that the programmer
does not need to be concerned with deallocating memory off the heap, nor with worrying
about memory leaks. Programmers developing in a memory-managed environment tend
to be more productive, and their programs tend to have fewer runtime errors. Like Java,
Android is a memory-managed programming environment. Managing memory turns out to
be such a good idea that both Microsoft and Apple have adopted this model for their mobile
development platforms.ix

Switching from ADT/Eclipse
If you are an experienced Android developer and are used to programming with ADT, you
are in for a pleasant surprise. Thankfully, all the SDK tools such as DDMS and Hierarchy
Viewer are still available, and you will find them easily accessible from within Android Studio.
If you’re an ADT user, you probably find yourself continuously cleaning and rebuilding your
projects in order to synchronize your resources with your source code (the dreaded R.java
synchronization error). In the months that we have been using Android Studio, we have
never been troubled with this problem. If you’re an experienced ADT user, then in order
to get up to speed with Android Studio, you will need to learn a few keyboard shortcuts,
familiarize yourself with Gradle, and reorient yourself to Android Studio’s presentation logic.
Altogether, this is a small price to pay for the power and pleasure of Android Studio.

Conventions Used in This Book
Android Studio is remarkably consistent across operating systems. In fact, the user
interfaces on Windows and Linux are almost identical. However, Mac OS users will find that
some of the locations of their menus and some keyboard shortcuts are different. We use
Windows when covering subjects that require OS navigation. However, when we indicate a
keyboard shortcut, we include both the Windows-Linux and Mac shortcuts separated by a
pipe (for example, Ctrl+K | Cmd+K). When appropriate, we include notes, links, and other
resources for Mac users.
2015-12-19 17:15 添加评论 分享
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ShortChin - 新手

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感谢楼主,楼主好人一生平安~
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ask

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当前最新进度是翻译到:Chapter 6: Reminders Lab: Part 2
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Allen_xu - 90后 新手

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楼主666
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VJ - 通信工程,AS学习中

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这个译本真是帮我了我大忙了
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cgzykj - 想进入ANDROID的世界

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好好学习一下英文。

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